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Wednesday, 1 July 2015
Same-Sex Divorce
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The good news from the Supreme Court regarding the recognition of same-sex marriages in all fifty states has meant different things to different people. For couples who had married in other states, and subsequently moved to Tennessee, that may have resulted in being trapped in a dead marriage and unable to get divorced. Life in general, jobs, and other obligations made it impractical, if not impossible, to move to another state and establish required residency in order to get a much needed divorce.

Just a few months ago, I had a call from a psychotherapist who asked if my Second Saturday divorce workshops were appropriate for someone in a same-sex marriage. Of course, my answer was a resounding "Yes," although I had to add that I had no idea how she would get the necessary divorce in the state of Tennessee. Today, the answer would be ,"Yes, and the information from the workshop will help her make better decisions regarding the divorce process and desired outcomes."
 
If you know of someone who has been in a seemingly hopeless situation  and ready for a long-overdue divorce, please have them visit call the number at the left for more information on the financial issues of divorce, and help as needed.
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Posted on 07/01/2015 7:59 AM by Rosemary

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